One of our baby squirrels in a donated fur coat 

One of our baby squirrels in a donated fur coat 

+ How do I find a wildlife rehabilitator near me?

To find a licensed wildlife rehabilitator in your area of NY, check the State Dept. of Environmental Conservation Wildlife Rehabilitator list . If no one comes up in your area on the first try, begin checking surrounding counties. NYC residents will often need to be prepared to take the animal to Long Island or upstate, as local rehabbers have very limited space. More info on these resources below.

+ Can you come pick up this animal?

Unfortunately we do not have resources to pick up any wildlife. There is not any organization that will pick up common animals in NYC such as pigeons, sparrows, squirrels, or opossums that we are aware of. It is up to you as a good samaritan to get the animal to the help it needs.

+ Local Wildlife Centers in the NYC area

LONG ISLAND:
Volunteers For Wildlife in Locust Valley - 516-674-0982
Long Island Wildlife and Animal Rescue in Massapequa - 516-797-8387
Wildlife In Need of Rescue and Rehabilitation in Massapequa - via Facebook
Marine Nature Study Area in Oceanside - 516-766-1580
Evelyn Alexander Wildlife Rescue Center in Hampton Bays - 631-728-9453
STAR in Middle Island - 631-736-8207 this is the local center we know of that will take orphaned fawns (deer)

UPSTATE:
Green Chimneys in Brewster - 845-279-2995

CONNECTICUT:
Wildlife in Crisis in Weston - 203-544-9913

NEW JERSEY:
Wild Baby Rescue in Blairstown - 908-362-9453
Links to wildlife rehabilitators here.
Links to wildlife centers here.

+ Help with Squirrels

If you found a baby, please scroll down and follow the directions for reuniting a baby with its mother. If this is not successful, then please contact our group or another licensed wildlife rehabilitator. Do not try to care for it or feed it on your own. Baby squirrels require a very specific diet and care protocol, and you could accidentally injure or kill it. Also, it is illegal to possess wildlife in NY without a license.

If you found a badly injured squirrel, please take it to a veterinarian (look for vets that treat exotic animals) or an Animal Care Center for medical care. Some other vets that accept exotic animals will also treat wildlife. After it is triaged by a veterinarian, we can then take it for rehabilitation. Unfortunately we do not have a volunteer vet in our group at this time. Be careful of bites, as squirrels have very strong jaws and sharp teeth. If you are bitten, seek medical attention immediately.

If you see a sick squirrel, for your own safety, do not try to catch it. Fill out this online form so that the parks department can investigate.

+ Help with Birds

Please contact Wild Bird Fund for advice at 646-306-2862. Leave a message and they will get back to you asap. If the bird is not fully feathered, look up and see if there is a nest you can return the bird to. Birds do not reject their young if a human has touched them- this is a myth. Scroll down to the flow chart below for more information about reuniting a baby bird with its mother.

You can also contact NYC Audubon at 212-691-7483.

Do not try to feed a nestling bird yourself, as you could accidentally injure or kill it. Also, it is illegal to possess wildlife in NY without a license. Keep the bird very warm until you can get it to a wildlife rehabilitator.

+ Help with Opossums

If you found a baby opossum, do not try to care for it or feed it on your own. Baby opossums are marsupials, and latch onto their mother’s nipple in the pouch for several months. A rehabber must tube feed babies this age- they cannot eat anything on their own. Also, it is illegal to possess wildlife in NY without a license.

If you found an injured opossum, please take it to a veterinarian (look for vets that treat exotic animals) or an Animal Care Center for medical care. After it is triaged by a veterinarian, we can then take it for rehabilitation. Unfortunately we do not have a volunteer vet in our group at this time. If you are bitten, seek medical attention immediately.

If you find a dead opossum, check if it is female! If so, feel inside the pouch for babies. We can often rehabilitate them if we receive them quickly. Keep them very warm and get to a rehabilitator asap.

If you see a sick opossum, for your own safety, do not try to catch it. Fill out this online form so that the parks department can investigate.

+ Help with Raccoons and Bats

Do NOT touch it! If a raccoon or bat scratches or bites a human, it must be killed and tested for rabies. Don’t put the animal in this situation! If you have been bitten or scratched by a raccoon or bat, seek medical attention immediately. Rabies is fatal. Raccoons can also carry raccoon roundworm, which is also very dangerous to humans and can cause blindness, liver, and brain damage.

If you found an injured or baby raccoon or bat, please call 311 and ask for Urban Park Rangers. Also fill out this online form so that the parks department can investigate. If you are concerned for the animal’s or public safety, also call an Animal Care Center to report the situation.

Unfortunately there are no licensed wildlife rehabilitators in NYC at this time who can help with raccoons or bats. This is because they are considered Rabies Vector Species (RVS) in NY. However, there are some licensed rehabbers in surrounding counties outside the city! You can find them by going to the DEC public list of rehabbers, then select "bats, raccoons, or skunks", then begin searching county by county.

+ Help with Coyote, Deer, or other large animals

Stay away from the animal. Do not touch or try to feed it. Please call 311 and ask for Urban Park Rangers. Also fill out this online form so that the parks department can investigate. If you are concerned for the animal’s or public safety, call 911 as well.

For coyote questions, please contact Gotham Coyote Project . We have many coyotes quietly living in NYC, so just spotting one is not a cause for alarm.

+ Help with Turtles

Please contact The NY Turtle and Tortoise Society for advice at info@nytts.org, or try the State Dept. of Environmental Conservation Wildlife Rehabilitator list . Do not release any non-native turtles in NY state, as this has tremendous consequences for native wildlife, even if the turtle can survive in this climate.

Still have questions?

Call us: 646 481 6259 Leave a message or text us (text preferred). Please include a photo of the animal. A rehabber will respond ASAP. Please be patient- we are all volunteers with full-time jobs separate from this organization.

Email us: info@urbanutopiawildlife.org


If you have found a baby squirrel (our most common call):

Whenever possible, it is best to reunite a baby squirrel with its mother; raising babies in captivity should always be a last resort, and in most cases a squirrel mother will be desperate to find her lost baby. To determine if a reunite is possible, first check:

  • Is the baby injured? 
  • Is the baby bleeding? 
  • Is it cold to the touch? (Baby squirrels should feel warm.)
  • Is there a dead parent nearby? 
  • Are there flies or maggots on the baby or in any of its orifices? 

If yes to any of these, contact a wildlife rehabilitator.

If no, try to reunite the baby with its mother:

  • If you have found a single baby check the area for any siblings.
  • Place the baby in a small (8-12in deep) box surrounded by soft material (fleece or similar).
  • Place instant hand warmers or a tightly sealed hot water bottle in the box with the baby for warmth (unless it is very hot outside).
  • Place the box near where the baby was found, preferably mounted as high as possible off the ground (wire or string can be used to affix the box to a tree).
  • Leave the area and observe from a distance- a mother squirrel won't return if people are nearby. The mother squirrel should return to retrieve her baby within two hours. If the nest was destroyed, the mother may build a new one before returning for her babies.
  • You can also play the below baby squirrel calls, which will help the mother find the baby if it's not calling on its own. There are many more of these you can find on youtube as well.

If the mother squirrel does not return, retrieve the baby, keep it in a warm place, and contact a wildlife rehabilitator immediately. Do not try to feed or give water to the baby squirrel. Feeding a baby squirrel without the proper supplies and training can be fatal to the baby.

For help with distressed mammals and baby animal reunites you may contact Urban Utopia Wildlife Rehabilitation directly via the above methods; please include a phone number where you can be reached. Please understand, our capacity is currently very limited, especially during spring and autumn baby squirrel season. We apologize if we cannot accept new animals for rehabilitation at the time you call; we hope to one day have the resources to accept every animal who needs us. 


Flow chart instructions to save and share below:

Baby bird and mammal chart from "Healers of the Wild: Rehabilitating Injured and Orphaned Wildlife" by Shannon K. Jacobs / Johnson Books. Rabbit chart courtesy of the Wildlife Center of Virginia. Opossum chart courtesy of Flint Creek Wildlife.


UUWR is a small non-profit organization dedicated to making the world a better place for humans and wildlife alike. We work with our community to spread awareness of the incredible wildlife population within New York City, and we strive to facilitate healthy relationships between New Yorkers and the fascinating creatures that are increasingly a part of urban life. With enough help from supporters like you we can one day reach our goal of opening NYC's first mammal-focused wildlife rehabilitation center. Please check out our "Get Involved" link above to see how you can help!